Search Naijapoets Contents Here

Translate Naijapoets Content

Enter Niajapoets Classroom Free

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Analysis Of The World Is Too Much With Us By William Wordsworth

In William Wordsworth poem "The World Is Too Much With Us", he tells of his dislike towards humans' ingratitude and lack of reverence for nature and its elements.

With the sonnet nature of the poem, Wordsworth professionally arranged his views in two parts; the first part being his complaint, the second part being his resolution. The poet says that human beings have had much of the world this era that their daily life activities blindfolded them from seeing and cherishing the beauties entombed in nature. He decides to derail into "paganism" because he sees more of nature and natural beauties in them than in anything else; deities like Proteus and Triton are his motivators.

The poem is a sonnet with the octave (1st 8 lines) about his complains while the sestet (the remaining 6 lines) about his resolution. The first eight lines have the end rhyme pattern of ABBAABBA while the rest six lines have the end rhyme pattern of CDCDCD. How much

"Love intoxicate" justify the assertion with a close reference toWilliam Shakespeare's "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day?"

QUESTION:- "Love intoxicate" justify the assertion with a close reference to William Shakespeare's "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day?" (NECO June/July 2016)

ANSWER:- Love is a universal language of all youth and adult. As falling out of love leads to a nervous breakdown, so does falling in love elates the body; making the expression that "love intoxicates" a very common expression.

Same strong feeling of love made the most famous of the Elizabethan poet (William Shakespeare) craft a certain love sonnet that continues to linger in the heart of every literary lovers.

"Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day" is a love poem by William Shakespeare that shows the deep intoxication of love through the poet's expression. Such intoxication led to the comparison of feminine beauty to a season "summer's day", placing

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Website That Analyzes Poems


What god can grumble as the thunder?
What heartbeat can beat louder than woofer?
Forget the mountain, check the peak
Shower your shout out, and make it quick
On naijapoets.com
No gimmick
Humbly humbly is smoother
Apple of the eyesight
The website
Analysing poetry
With the evergreen taste of a rum
To match the uniform
The elephant blowing
Now the trumpet
Blowing animals must quickly cease
Till the King releases the blowing franchise
As freebies
No questioning, no querying
Gourd is calabash; calabash is gourd
A question with no vapor for anyon
Within is God
God above all; the all-in-all.
Samuel C. Enunwa aka samueldpoetry
(the Leo with wings flying)

About The Poem: The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

According to article of gradesaver.com "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is a narrative poem written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. It was first published in 1798, though Coleridge's 1817 revision is a more commonly-used version of the text. Coleridge was inspired to write the poem by a book called A Voyage Round The World by Way of the Great South Sea, which his friend, the poet William Wordsworth, was reading at the time. Coleridge intended to emulate the old tradition of the ballad, which had experienced a resurgence in popularity at the time of the poem's composition.

An Ancient Mariner, unnaturally old and skinny, with deeply-tanned skin and a "glittering eye", stops a Wedding Guest who is on his way to a wedding reception with two companions. He tries to resist the Ancient Mariner, who compels him to sit and listen to his woeful tale. The Ancient Mariner tells his tale, largely interrupted save for the sounds from the wedding reception and..." Read the rest at gradesaver.com

SEARCH THE POEM:-  The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner by S.T. Coleridge

Samuel C. Enunwa aka samueldpoetry
(the Leo with wings flying)

Monday, June 20, 2016

Analysis Of Parable By William Soutar

He was a Scottish poet, born in 1898 at Perth. He had his university education at Edinburgh. For the last years of his life, he was invalided as he suffered from paralysis. He died in 1943.
The issue of fencing abodes or properties is not new in poetry, Robert Frost has a poem about fence he titled Mending Wall. This William Soutar poem "Parable" no except, it's about two neighbors believe in the marking of their boundaries with fence would prevent them from stepping on each other's toes and by so doing, everlasting peace would reign. Priority was so much placed on their fences to extent the bricks of their buildings were taken down to improve the solidness of their fences but the maintenance of the fence brought them quarrel or fight that made their fences buried them alive.
Parable is a three-stanza poem with end rhyme pattern of AABBCCDD; the rhythm is strictly planned by the poet to maintain the minimum of four feet per line of the poem. The satirical ingredient used by the poet made the poem a very lively one. The poem used military words like barricaded, battlements, ramparts to show that it was not love that propelled the neighbors to build the fence but fear, jealousy, anger and hatred which culminated into war that destroyed them both.
The theme of self-destruction is one among the themes of the poem. Both neighbors unknowingly built their minefields (their fence) in quest for peace and security "Two neighbors, who were rather dense/ Considered that their mutual fence/ Were more symbolic of their peace/ (Which they maintained should never cease)" in line 1-4. Their intended peace led to no-peace and their destruction "They curse, they strike, they break the wall/ Which buries them beneath its fall" in line 29-30.
Another theme is the fear of neighbor's encroachment. Each neighbors as described by the poem speaker were exercising fear, none trusted his neighbors with his belongings and in disguise of peace they thought could secure their properties.
Futility is another theme of the poem. In the sense that the characters in question held high value towards what they shouldn't; their belongings to the level that they sacrificed their dwelling to preserve their

Friday, June 17, 2016

Analysis Of No Coffin No Grave By Jared Angira

This poem is about the shameful murder of a tyrant. He was stabbed and shut in front of a night club; the poet sarcastically compared his murder shut to a gunshot representing a last respect to a warrior. Instead of the poem being a pure elegy, the poet created a sarcastic elegy which was beautified with irony and euphemism to show his dislike towards the wicked and selfish life led by the tyrant leader; it was so unfortunate for the dead politician who wished to have respected burial rite but ended with a belittled massacre.
The content of the poem is straightforward as a result of the simple diction maintained by the poet. Line 1-7 shows where and how the tyrant was buried, line 8-17 describes the event of his murder by comparing the murder gunshot, and state of his car, line 18-28 tells of the unwell condition of the masses and their state of no-say because they lived in a lower class, line 29-end is about<!--more--> the politician's empty wish for a befitting end.
Few of the themes in the poem are uncertainty of life and living, shameful rewards for selfishness and wickedness, poverty within the masses, extravagance and embezzlement. The death of the tyrant proved that life is uncertain and whatever anyone sows, he/she will reap.
NO COFFIN, NO GRAVE
He was buried without a coffin
without a grave
the scavengers performed the
post-mortem
in the open mortuary
without sterilized knives
in front of the night club
stuttering rifles put up
the gun salute of the day
that was a state burial anyway
the car knelt
the red plate wept, wrapped
itself in blood its master’s
the diary revealed to the sea
the rain anchored there at last
isn’t our flag red, black, and
white?
so he wrapped himself well
who could signal yellow
when we had to leave politics
to the experts
and brood on books
brood on hunger
and schoolgirls
grumble under the black pot
sleep under torn mosquito net
and let lice lick our intestines
the lord of the bar, money
speaks madam
woman magnet, money speaks
madam
we only cover the stinking
darkness
of the cave of our mouths
and ask our father who is in hell
to judge him
the quick and the good
Well, his dairy, submarine of the
Third World War
showed he wished
to be buried in a gold-laden
coffin
like a VIP
under the jacaranda tree beside
his palace
a shelter for his grave
and much beer for the funeral
party
anyway one noisy pupil
suggested we bring
tractors and plough the land.
©copyright Jared Angira
According to wikipedia article, "Jared Angira (born 21 November 1947) is a Kenyan poet. He has been called "the country's first truly significant poet.
Angira studied commerce at the University of Nairobi from 1968 until 1971."
Samuel C. Enunwa aka samueldpoetry
(the Leo with wings flying)






About The Poem The Battle Of Stamford Bridge By Laurence Binyon

The poem titled The Battle Of Stamford Bridge is a narrative war poem. It narrates a certain battle between England and Norway. The battle involved sailing, burning and acquisition of territories. The poem with end rhyme pattern of ABCCB has a well planned equal stanzas of five lines per stanza; 18 stanzas, totalling 90 lines.
SEARCH & READ The Battle Of Stamford Bridge By Laurence Binyon>>>
Samuel C. Enunwa aka samueldpoetry
(the Leo with wings flying)

3 Themes Of Lonely Days By Bayo Adebowale


Lonely Days is authored by Bayo Adebowale, an educator and a writer. Bayo Adebowale is an Associate Professor at the Bells University of Technology, Ota, Ogun state. Lonely Days has a storyline about a widow who against all odds became celebrated in her community due to hardwork and independence.
Below are 3 irrefutable themes in the story:
(i) Disadvantages of widowhood
(ii) Gender inequality among Africans
(iii) Hardwork and self-esteem
DISADVANTAGES OF WIDOWHOOD
The story placed its protagonist (who is a widow) through the disadvantages of widowhood. Yaremi (the protagonist) in her black mourner's attires, has not fully got over the sorrow of losing her husband (Ajumobi) when other negative effects of widowhood began to pile. She became lonely fending for herself alone yet the envies and criticism from the people of Kufi village made matters worse; like other widows, Yaremi was expected to be down in self-esteem but she was not, she was expected to depend her living on another man in Kufi but she didn't.
According to the storyline, Fayoyin, who was also a widow, was made to lick libation and sing dirge at her husband's death; and her beautifully woven hair was shaved to bard skull. Other disadvantages the widow characters face in the story are castigation, maltreatment, forceful second marriage, etc.
GENDER INEQUALITY AMONG AFRICANS
Gender inequality has been a very big issue in Africa, both in urban and in rural parts. In Lonely Days, the issue surfaced among dwellers of Kufi village. The men are highly placed above women and women are meant to have cold feet whenever issue between man and women arise. Even a Yoruba proverb says "let a man pee while walking and a woman pee while walking and we shall see which one will wet her legs with urine".
One of the ways with which men prove their superiority over women in Kufi village is the forceful cap-picking which is organized for the widows; in such event, men interested in such a widow will submit their cap for the widow to pick one.
HARDWORK AND SELF-ESTEEM
Hardwork and self-esteem are made to be the treasures of women in Lonely Days by Bayo Adebowale. Those who possess both are gloried as in the case of Yaremi, the novel's protagonist and widow. She is a dedicated mother who not only believe in herself but also in female emancipation and empowerment due to her vast experience and exposure. Yaremi was so hardworking to the level that her trade was known across surrounding villages.

MUST READ:- Summary of Native Son by Richard Wright



Discussion The Relationship Between Nii Kpakpo And Maa Tsuru InFaceless By Amma Darko (WASSCE 2016 LITERATURE-IN-ENGLISH)

It could be agreed that Maa Tsuru was manipulated out her vulnerability but the love relationship between Nii Kpakpo and Maa Tsuru was such an unreasonable one built on lies, deceit and shamelessness.
Maa Tsuru who was mother to Baby T. and Fofo can tagged irresponsible and shameless. She was unable to properly cater for her children due to the burden of single parenting yet started an untidy second love relationship despite her first marital failure that kept her and the children in their present state of mess.
Nii Kpakpo is also a shameless, heartless, jobless drunkard; who took advantage of Maa Tsuru's state of loneliness. He was homeless, only to move in with Maa Tsuru and added to her burdens under the guise of being love with her. He was such an ingrate to point that he sexually abused Baby T (one of Maa Tsuru's daughters).
Maa Tsuru believed Kpakpo's lie of being temporarily out of his factory job, she also fell for the lie that as soon as he got his job back, he would be taking good care of her. In this wise, they began living together in an uncomfortable one room to the extent that Maa Tsuru's abnormal love led her to partition the single room so that her and Nii Kpakpo could be sharing privacy.


Monday, June 13, 2016

Overview Of Alone By Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe revealed that all the things had been of mystery to him, had remained mysterious since his childhood; as a result of his imaginative reasoning and absolute flare for loneliness. From line 1 to 8, he said that things that delighted the kids were in no way delightful to him and all the things he had loved, were in his state of loneliness.
The poem is a 23-line poem with a well structured lines (in terms of rhythm and end rhyme) the lines are in tetrameter with a line having similar end rhyme with the next line in form of couplet. The dominant poetic device is repetition of phrases "I have not", "As others", "I lov'd", "From the", etc.
One among the themes of the poem is mystery. Poe had himself full of life's mystery. He confessed that the ways everything was mysterious in his childhood still remained mysterious in his adulthood. Another theme is loneliness and deep sense of imagi

Analysis Of Heart's Eye View by Niyi Osundare

In the poem titled "Heart's Eye View" by Niyi Osundare, the persona or poem speaker went through an imaginative travel like a soul in deep meditational realm_ all in the name of something longed for or something missed heartily (which could be a home or a feminine or a family) but the last two lines of the poem really suggested a loved one or a lover: "Every wingstep brings me/ Closer to your wondrous arms"
In Osundare's imagination, he was travelling in an aircraft which made him refer to as "wingstep" in line 9 and his use of wingstep implied a metaphor; meaning, a progressive movement like footsteps. His travel was from Europe to Africa; over the deserts and over the seas. The poem speaker's destination was an unspecified city or nation by the sea which he symbolized as an angel in line 7-8 "And on to the angel/ Waiting by the sea". Since the poet is a Nigerian with resident in Lagos, so "the angel/ Waiting by the sea" might mean Lagos Island.
Besides the rare concept of tabling an homesickness, other things loved about the poem are simplicity, line flexibility, no rigid rhyming, etc. The poem has a moderate sibilance, clear imageries, tiny chopped stanzas, and a traveller point of view any reader can find appealing.

           READ MORE AFRICAN POETIC ANALYSIS >>>
Samuel C. Enunwa aka samueldpoetry
(the Leo with wings flying) 


Sunday, June 12, 2016

Analysis Of The Cathedral By Kofi Awoonor

Awoonor's displease is obvious from the first line of the poem with the phrase "dirty patch". A patch is meant to cover a damage but "dirty" used by the poet suggests that the "patch" is inaccurate or inappropriate. After a very calm and solemn comparison, Awoonor hits the nail in the head to disapprove of the site of the edifice; "A huge senseless cathedral of doom" (line 9).
The poem explained what it used to be before a certain cathedral was erected to take the place of a very
--