we The Resident Season 4 Episode 13 Review: A Children's Story ~ Naija Poets

For the most part, it was all positive news for many at Chastain.

And to keep with that theme, by the end of The Resident Season 4 Episode 13, Nic told Conrad that she was in labor!

Yes, baby CoNic is on the way, and we'll hopefully get to see this happy family before the season comes to a close.

The hour did a good job of addressing what it's like when one becomes too attached to a patient. Ironically, we've seen it time and again with many patients over the years.

And Conrad, someone who attempted to give Devon advice on the matter, is one of the biggest offenders. From Lily onward, there have been many patients we've seen him become too attached and invested in over the years.

In that sense, it does answer the question that Leela was asking herself by the end of the hour. There should be a line drawn between showing enough compassion and care for a patient and distancing oneself.

However, when it comes down to it, the best health care workers air on the side of attachment and compassion. If you got into the field for all the right reasons, then it's an inevitable effect of the job.

Devon is years into this, and he's still struggling the same way that Leela, an intern, is, which speaks to how the conflict never disappears regardless of experience.

It's one of many things that the two have in common, and while you could say the series has no qualms about teasing the romantic potential of these two, and they even resort to using the other characters to point it out with frequency, it's convincing.

Leela: How am I supposed to do this job when getting close to my patients and keeping distance from them both feel wrong?
Devon:I ask myself that all the time, but there is no right answer.

I'm all-in with the potential Devon and Leela romance and enjoying the beautiful build-up between the two. It's incredible how much of a difference it makes when the show takes its time, allows the natural chemistry and pacing to flow, and develops a bond between the two.

They've already established a regular routine of buying each other coffee before they start their shift. It feels like the show is gearing toward something romantic down the line, but it also doesn't seem like boundaries are being tested or crossed.

We can tell that there is interest on Devon's part, at the very least, but nothing about how close they've become feels like some inauthentic prelude to Devon hitting on her or something.

Devon has served as a lovely confidant for Leela, and it's through that bond that we continue to learn more about her. I appreciate the subtle nature of how The Resident addresses her learning disability.

It's a driving force behind almost everything she does as a doctor, and she speaks of it when she feels compelled to, but it doesn't define her either.

It's always there, present in whatever she does and how she operates, instead of this one-off thing about her that they drudge up for plot convenience. It's ever-present. And it seems to go beyond Dyslexia, too, even though they haven't specifically defined it.

Leela always has something to prove to herself and her father, and you see that in everything that she does. But it's important that the series continues to show that despite what she deems liabilities that she has to work extra hard to overcome, she's an exceptional doctor.

She's still an intern who makes mistakes, and she's not perfect, but her learning disability doesn't set her back either. She's the perfect balance of accomplished and eager but inexperienced with a lot to learn.

She works well under pressure, and she and Devon jumped right into action at the fire scene. But it was apparent that she would grow too attached to Doug no matter what happened.

He was a sweet man, a hero, selfless in a way that you don't see, and a tragic end was his destiny.

AJ warned Leela about getting too close, but it's easy to do when someone like Doug is funny, conversational, and sweet. It would make it difficult to keep the guard up and hold him at arm's length, and understandably, it would come across as rude.

Doug's rib piercing his aorta but keeping him alive long enough to get to the hospital was fascinating. And the paternal energy he gave off was the type of thing that would break through Leela's defenses.

Devon: What kind of doctor do you want to be?
Leela: Since medical school, my goal has been to just survive. To minimize my liabilities,to not get kicked out of the club. A lot of that came from my father.
Devon: Controlling what you thought needed to be controlled.
Leela: Yeah. But I'm learning that being a dispassionate robot isn't in my nature. And it won't make me a better doctor.
Devon: That's funny. That's the same answer I came up with.

It was awful when he died and heart-aching that Leela spent the better part of a half-hour trying to resuscitate him to no avail.

On a personal note, it's cases like that which reminded me of one of many reasons I wouldn't last in the lifesaving field without burnout. It would be impossible not to get attached to the plethora of patients that cross my path.

Leela's tearful breakdown in the same room that Doug died had shades of Conrad mourning Lily, and it spoke to what Devon told her. Finding the balance is something that most healthcare professionals ask themselves every day, and there isn't a right answer.

Despite Devon's advice, he struggled similarly with Rose. We've known he had a special bond with her since she first appeared.

Conrad: You ready to tell me what's going on, why you terfed her to me?
Devon: I'm not sure myself, honestly. Look, I care about Rose, and I'm open about that. I've been her doctor since the moment she stepped into Chastain. I found her that clinical trial. I've held her hand through the worst of it.
Conrad: I agree you've been exemplary, top-notch physician.
Devon: This morning I saw her in a coffee shop with Cain. They were holding hands. It's obvious that they're together. And I'm feeling ...I don't know. Jealous. But to be clear, I don't want an intimate relationship with Rose. She's my patient,and that is a line that I'm never going to cross. But why is Cain, who we know is a problematic human being at best, taking a victory lap with my patient? I want her healed, OK? I really do, but all of a sudden, I'm feeling, I'm feeling protective of her. Which is ...
Conrad: Yeah, not your job. Our patients whenthey leave the hospital they're going to do whatever the hell they want, and who knows. Cain has been through a lot. She has been through a lot maybe they'll be good for each other. You never know.
Devon: Yeah, you never know.
Conrad: I mean who would've thought you and Dr. Davie would be perfect for each other.
Devon: Oh, get out of here.
Conrad: What? I'm just happy for you guys, man!

Their chemistry lit up the screen, and while it easily could've been reduced to something with a romantic twinge, it's equally as sensible that his care for her operated outside of that.

I like that the hour didn't reduce Devon's jealousy and feelings to something romantic or sexual. Attachments come in many different forms, and the others are just as valid.

Devon was with Rose every step of the way for the Sickle Cell journey from the second Rose walked through the doors. He had some investment in her well-being, and they became friendly.

He also has this softer, gentler, more personable approach to taking care of patients ever since his father died.

He gets props for removing himself from the situation for a bit to sort out his feelings and get some distance and perspective. And with Cain, it makes sense that he'd feel a way about Cain's presence in Rose's life now.

Everything he knows about Cain isn't good, and it's reasonable that he wouldn't want Cain around someone as good and sweet as Rose. But it's also not his choice to make, so he had to stay in his lane.

Conrad took a surprisingly chill take on the matter about Cain, and again, I guess we're resigned to the fact that everyone has just gotten over Cain and moved on. Sure, OK.

And while Rose and Cain haven't made any official commitments to each other, it's apparent that the two are something.

Rose: I'm going to need you to say it.
Devon: OK. Rose, your gene therapy worked, and you're cured.
Rose: I don't even know where to begin. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart. You've changed my life.
Devon: I should be thanking you. You trusted me, and because you did, a lot of people suffering from Sickle Cell are going to get a chance to be cured.

The good news -- best news-- is that Bio South's clinical trial is a success, and Rose is Sickle Cell-free right now. It was such a relief when Devon shared the news with her, and it's the type of happy ending that she deserves.

Rose can lead a happy, healthy, and active life.

The tribute at the end of the hour to Rose Elizabeth Honorat was touching. The Resident's Rose got a happy ending in her fight against Sickle Cell, but Rose Elizabeth and many others haven't been so fortunate, but hopefully, one day, that'll change.

Bell, Jake, and Sammie were bringing the feelings, too.

Little Sammie is the cutest little girl, and her English has come along well. As predicted, Jake and Greg are invested in her and plan to adopt her in lieu of a newborn with a surrogate.

They've fallen in love with her, and you can't blame them, but that's come with some stress. She had another battle for her life when she required more surgery.

Grandpa Bell is the best, right? Like, you could see the love flowing through him. He's fond of this little girl as if she's his actual grandchild, and you can tell he's pleased beyond measure to have this family he craved.

He and Jake are in a good place. Jake sees Bell for the wonderful man and doctor that he is, and he looked at him with love and gratitude for Sammie's successful surgery.

Everything about this family is pure. It's a rush of much-needed serotonin.

AJ's family has a similar enough effect, and thank goodness the target therapy for Carol worked. It's such a relief, as it would've been devastating if they killed off AJ's mother.

The man went through enough already.

What do you make of AJ's expression after he shared the good news with his parents? It seemed as though he tried to hide his fear that the Target Therapy wouldn't work and his mother could pass away.

But it also probably makes him think about Mina. The only reason he stayed at Chastain was because of his mother's ailing health. I'm sure he's grateful beyond words that his mother is OK now, but a part of him has to wonder how things could've been if he was able to leave.

It'll sound worse than what's intended, but AJ's mentorship of Leela has been a much stronger and more compelling arc for him post-Mina than the touch-and-go story with his mother's health.

And the same can be said for Billie.

Typically, stories like Billie's invoke so much emotion out of me, but for whatever reason, I checked out.

We learned a bit more about Billie's past. It's crushing enough that she was sexually assaulted as a teen.

It's unspeakable that she had to endure something so monstrous, but she revealed to Nic that she had a child who is a product of that rape.

I can't imagine what Billie is going through right now. Planning Nic's baby shower likely brought up some things anyway, but then her birth son was obsessively texting her the entire time.

I would love to know how he gained access to her information if the adoption was supposed to be closed.

And while there are a series of valid emotions and things that he faces as a child given up for adoption, and he probably needs answers or is searching for something himself, if the adoption was closed, it's annoying that he didn't accept that.

Logically, we know that there are many reasons why a woman gives up her child, and Billie's reasoning is sadly a common one, so it's a bit disturbing that he's harassing her like this when she made it clear she doesn't want to be bothered.

He's no more entitled to meet her as she would be if she tracked him down and expected him to let her in his life.

It's distressing for Billie, and Nic has reason to be concerned about her mental well-being. I even feared that she would be so upset that she got into an accident or something.

Billie's curious about her son, but she also fears how she'll react if she has to face a young man that looks or reminds her too much of her rapist.

He's the product of something awful. Something I have worked very hard to put behind me. It's not his fault, but it's the truth. What if I look at his face and all I see is the man who raped me? And what if he asks me about his father? Will I tell him? Would that be fair to him? How does that help him in his life?

Billie

She has every right to put herself and her mental health first. She also makes valid points about her reluctance to share the truth with this young man. It's not going to do him any good knowing that his existence is a result of an act of violence.

Who would want to burden someone with that hard truth?

The two of them meeting could cause more pain than anything else, and Billie is trying to consider that.

But we know that they wouldn't introduce this information if they don't plan to explore it, so it's bound to be an emotional experience.

The baby shower shenanigans added a bit of humor. They could've left most of it out, but Marshall and Kyle as the bickering but pleased as punch future grandpas were adorable.

Marshall giving the baby stock as a present made me laugh out loud, and the two of them bickering over the color orange was hilarious.

Outside of that, the break from Chastain didn't get interesting until the end when everyone celebrated the parents-to-be. And, of course, when Nic revealed that she's in labor!

Bring on baby CoNic!

Conrad: We're going to the hospital.
Nic: And I think I'm in labor.

Over to you, Resident Fanatics. Are you excited for baby CoNic? Are you thrilled Jake and Greg are adopting Sammie?

What are your thoughts on Devon, Leela, Rose, and Cain? Hit the comments below!

You can watch The Resident online here via TV Fanatic.



source https://www.tvfanatic.com/2021/05/the-resident-season-4-episode-13-review-a-childrens-story/

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Article Index

Blog Archive