Showing posts with label love. Show all posts
Showing posts with label love. Show all posts
Lullaby is a soothing song intended to lull a child to sleep. In the poem "Lullaby" by W. H. Auden, two crucial subjects were placed side-by-side; love and lullaby.

With the notion of the poem, lullaby is the best way to love which surpassed outward appreciation, nighttime sensual moments and cohabitational responsibilities. Auden saw no certainty in other things than lullaby.

He believed that time and sickness destroy youthfulness and its accompanied hopefulness through aging and dying; that's why the night his lover lie on his arms was worth everything to him.

Auden accepted the strong emotionality within romantic ecstasy but failed to attach importance to such ecstasy because it was gravy. Such ecstasy leads to other things like parenting:

"Soul and body have no bounds:
To lovers as they lie upon
Her tolerant enchanted slope
In their ordinary swoon,
Grave the vision Venus sends
Of supernatural sympathy,
Universal love and hope;
While abstract insight wakes
Among the glaciers and the rocks
The hermit's sensual ecstasy."

In stanza 3, Auden explained that although lovemaking as a means of quenching the cry of boredom, only last a very short period of time "like vibrations of a bell" but nothing will deny him such moment with his lover; not even the scary future.

In the last stanza of the poem, Auden re-ascertained that "Beauty, midnight, vision dies" but that night spent together with his lover will serve as substitution for other things:

"Let the winds of dawn that blow
Softly round your dreaming head
Such a day of sweetness show
Eye and knocking heart may bless,
Find your mortal world enough;
Noons of dryness see you fed
By the involuntary powers,
Nights of insult let you pass
Watched by every human love."

"Lullaby" is a 40 line poem divided into 10 lines per stanza. The setting of poem is nighttime and the poem can be categorized under love and life. Love is the central theme of the poem but other themes such as death, growth, beauty, surfaced.

There are no planned end rhyme scheme though the title suggested  a song. The tone is sweet and wooing with the multiple use of images of sight. Other poetic devices in the poem are alliteration in line 15 and 16 respectively "vision Venus sends" and "supernatural sympathy" then simile in line 23 "Like vibrations of a bell" then metonymy in line "fevers" which was used to replace sicknesses then litotes in line "swoon" which was used by Auden to undermine love.

"All the dreaded cards foretell" even though Auden mentioned "faithless" in line 2, this show that the poet related with soothsayers to a certain extent.

Wystan Hugh Auden commonly called W. H. Auden was an English poet born 21th February, 1907. He later nationalized to an American citizen but departed earth on 29th September, 1973 at the age of 66.

READ MORE POETIC ANALYSIS >>>

Samuel C. Enunwa aka samueldpoetry
(the Leo with wings flying)

Love III by George Herbert is an eighteen line love poem with a static rhythm plus end rhyme pattern of ABABCCDEDEFFGHGHII. The message of the poem is about the unconditional love of Christ and the unrighteous nature of human.


Absence by Pablo Neruda has the theme of love and optimism. Neruda composed the poem on the ground of love; based on the context of the poem, we see two lovers without close contact. While the female feels hurt, the poem speaker composed this reassuring poem to prove that his love for her remains intact. Last stanza of the poem shows the optimistic nature of the poet:
"But wait for me,
Keep for me your sweetness.
I will give you too
A rose."


THE ANALYSIS:-

"Katerina: An Angel In The Flesh" is a descriptive love poem that embraced the instrument of praise and prayer.

The most part of the poem described Femi Fani Kayode's Katerina as an extraordinary beauty; using the same hyperbolical language of William Shakespeare's craftiness. The ending part of the poem carry some hope words that are tabled in form of prayer.

Few of the poetic devices in the poem are enjambment (as ideas or expressions flow beyond a single line), simile (many comparisons are made in the poem using "like" for instance "Your

Over The World's Rim by William Faulkner is dominated by rhetorical questions. I guess this four stanza poem is motivated by the swift and steady rotation of the earth, time and seasons. At the moment Faulkner wrote the poem, it was December (end of the year): "Over the world's rim, drawing bland November/ Reluctant behind them, drawing the moons of cold" referring to line 1-2.
With the aid of rhetorical questions the poet wondered why the seasons keep dying and resurrecting on earth, he wondered if he had once had such privilege before he was born to this earth where he owned his living to death's limitation:
"What do their lonely voices wake to remember
In this dust ere 'twas flesh? what restless old
Dream a thousand years was safely sleeping
Wakes my blood to sharp unease? what horn

QUESTION:- "Love intoxicate" justify the assertion with a close reference to William Shakespeare's "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day?" (NECO June/July 2016)

ANSWER:- Love is a universal language of all youth and adult. As falling out of love leads to a nervous breakdown, so does falling in love elates the body; making the expression that "love intoxicates" a very common expression.

Same strong feeling of love made the most famous of the Elizabethan poet (William Shakespeare) craft a certain love sonnet that continues to linger in the heart of every literary lovers.

"Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day" is a love poem by William Shakespeare that shows the deep intoxication of love through the poet's expression. Such intoxication led to the comparison of feminine beauty to a season "summer's day", placing

In our little village
When elders are around,
Boys must not look at girls
And girls must not look at boys
Because the elders say
That is not good.

Even wn night comes
Boys must play separately,
Girls must play separately.
But humanity is weak
So boys and girls meet.

The boys play hide and seek
And the girls play hide and seek.
The boys know where the girls hide
And the girls know where the boys hide_
So in their hide and seek,
Boys seek girls,
And each to each sing
Songs of love.
©Markwei Martie

The author of the poem, Life In Our Village, is a Ghanaian poet and writer, he later took to religious path and career.

Looking at the poem which has 3 stanzas of unequal lines, the first stanza talks about the reason why boys and girls must not play together, the second stanza stated the reason why boys and girls didn't heed the advice and played together, the final stanza was about the outcome of the boys and girls play together.

The spoke of reality in an entertaining way. It held a classic rural setting (like in the days when moon

Check Livescore

Popular Posts